Transform or be Transformed. ExL Digital Pharma East Conference – Day2

If I were allowed but one word to describe Day 2 of ExL’s Digital Pharma East Conference #digpharm, it would have to be the urgent need for transformation—the need for Pharma Co’s to work faster than ever to effect internal change and to jump start meeting current and evolving customer expectations.

Throughout both days actually, speakers talked about the industry having to move from brand marketing to customer marketing, to move on your own with change or risk getting moved by others… and creating your own ‘Kodak moment’ or worse yet becoming a dinosaur…

To read the full article “Transform Or Be Transformed.  ExL Digital Pharma East Conference- Day 2 Wrap-up“, click here to go to ExL’s Digital Pharma blog.

Stay tuned for Day 3’s Digital Pharma East- Mobile Day Wrap-up…

If you missed Day 1’s Digital Pharma East Wrap-up, “Loaded for Bear”, click here.

Loaded For Bear: Day 1- ExL Digital Pharma East Conference

Pharma, are you ready to leverage customer insights and closed loop marketing (CLM) in your iPad and mobile initiatives to help support customers?

To read the full article “Loaded For Bear: Day 1- ExL Digital Pharma Eastclick here to go to ExL’s Digital Pharma blog.

Stay tuned for Day 2 and Mobile Marketing’s Day 3 summaries…

 

Patients Beware: 1 out of 3 Subject To Hospital Error

Medical errors are one of the Nation’s leading causes of death and injury—the famed 1999 Institute of Medicine (IOM) study, To Err Is Human, estimated that avoidable medical errors contributed to 44,000–98,000 deaths at US hospitals annually.  Using the lower estimate,this suggests that more people die from medical errors than from fatal car crashes, breast or pancreatic cancer, or HIV/AIDS.

In November 2010, The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Inspector General found that in  1 in 7 (13.5%) Medicare admissions experienced adverse events during their hospital stays. Further, for 1 in 70 Medicare admissions, the patient experienced an event that contributed to their deaths, which projects to 15,000 patients a month.  And that’s just Medicare!  (Sadly, Physician reviewers determined that over 40% were preventable. )

Also in November, an article in the New England Journal of Medicine NEJM reported on the first large study in a decade to analyze harm from medical care and to track it over time.  The study, conducted from 2002-2007 in 10 North Carolina hospitals, found that harm to patients was common and the number of incidents did not decrease over time.  The most common problems were complications from procedures or drugs and hospital-acquired infections.  The Harvard Medical School authors focused on North Carolina because its hospitals, compared with those in most states, have been more involved in programs to improve patient safety. [NYT Article]

So despite JAMA’s 2008 protest article suggesting that the medical error numbers were exaggerated, it appears that the situation is much worse than To Err is Human suggested. [Alternatively, an investigation by the Hearst media corporation, estimated preventable medical mistakes and infections to be responsible for about 200,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.]

The bottom line, patients have a basic expectation when they receive health care… that they will not be ‘harmed’ in the process…BUT hospitals can be dangerous.  Even good, hardworking people can (and do) make mistakes.  E-patients must be aware and engaged in everything that happens in the hospital. .. Your second set of eyes can make quite a difference. Continue reading

Diabetes Alert Day: Secrets from a Health Coach and Competitive Power Lifter!

March 22 kicks off ADA’s Diabetes Alert Day, a one-day “wake-up” call asking the American public to take the Diabetes Risk Test to find out if they are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Alert Day kicks off ADA’s “Join the Million Challenge,” which runs through April 22 with the goal of rallying ONE MILLION people to take the Diabetes Risk Test.  

 In honor of Diabetes Alert Day, and my Dad who lived with Type 2 diabetes, I want to introduce Ginger Vieira, a health coach, writer, and diabetes expert at  www.Living-in-progress.com and author of her new book “Your Diabetes Science Experiment.” She’s lived with Type 1 diabetes and Celiac disease for 12 years. As an avid athlete, Ginger has set 15 records in drug-tested powerlifting with her best lifts being a 190 lb bench press, 265 lb squat, and a 308 lb deadlift.

I was introduced to Ginger by Loretta Jamar [@nurseloretta] because Ginger acted as a health coach to her teenage son struggling with his new diagnosis of diabetes.  He found Ginger’s YouTube videos much more interesting and helpful than the typical doctor or mommy “speak”!

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2010 Outlook: 10 Ways to Win With Patients and Improve DTC Efforts

[Full article: 2010 Outlook: Doom and Gloom For DTC? 10 Points for Winning with Patients, published in DTC Perspectives, December 2009]

Despite many gloomy predictions for DTC advertising and the pharma industry overall, there’s never been a better time for marketers to forward their brands and consumers’ lives with new thinking about what constitutes patient marketing in the 21st Century (DTC 21).  Ten prescriptions can help improve focus and strengthen DTC efforts in 2010.  Important media and technology trends are also “musts” to actively consider for those who want to bump impact and value.

  1. Adopt an updated definition for DTC that considers the full picture of how consumers will interpret and interact with a brand TODAY. This calls for attention beyond “big bang” marketing spends, and begs for identifying meaningful levers to drive education and growth. DTC is no longer just an awareness or acquisition vehicle to move “eyeballs” through a linear marketing funnel; it’s every influence and touch needed to bring new information and education, help convert, instill loyalty and inspire advocacy.  Continue reading

Pharma: Is Your Brand Patient-Centered? 5 Critical Success Factors.

[As originally posted in MedAd News, November 2009]

Almost every pharma company likes to think of itself as
“patient-centric,” but prescription brands can become
patient-centered only by putting consumers at the heart of their business model through every stage of product development and deployment and by focusing relentlessly on patient experience and outcomes. This means integrating tough consumer questions and learning into every phase of commercialization. Consumers increasingly demand direct communication and they expect the kind of standards to which they are accustomed in other industries. This is a major challenge, with substantial rewards awaiting those who find their way.

Adopting five critical success factors improves success. Marketers must put patients at the center of every decision right from the beginning; translate clinical benefits to real
world health grains; encourage a more collaborative relationship between doctor and patient; improve patient and caregiver experience through the treatment pathway; and take nothing for granted, understanding that even small details can be meaningful to patients and families.

A newcomer might wonder why pharma needs reminding to center on the patient; it’s a stated part of virtually every company mission. Traditionally,
patients were not viewed as the primary customer—physicians were, and in some ways still are. New drugs were positioned to get maximum uptake and support of the primary gatekeepers: healthcare professionals, who were thought to know their patients. New products reaching their primary end points without safety issues were launched to physicians. While consumer companies can more easily design desired product features and benefits into the development process, drug
recovery is fraught with special hurdles, plus limitations of what benefits new
prescription or biologic entitles deliver in clinical use. As a result, many compounds fail before FDA approval.  Continue reading

EMR vs. EHR? Are They The Same And Should We Care?

Wikipedia
Today I learned a new distinction that may be obvious to many, but somehow escaped me.  For the last five years, the numerous discussions of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) and Electronic Health Records (EHR) seem to have blurred in my mind. But today I read a post that finally helped set me straight… and provided further insight in my on-going quest to define and  ‘master’ patient-centered marketing. 

According to EHR Scope’s blog:

An Electronic Medical Record (EMR) is a system that enables physicians’ to have electronic patient charts.  This system is solely for the physician, therefore, the legal record of a patient encounter is owned by the physician.  The EMR is not interactive, and all patient information is stored within the physician’s computer.

An Electronic Health Record (EHR) is a system that focuses on the word ‘Health,’ which implies the scope of a patient’s well-being. The most important term that you must associate with an EHR is interconnectivity. An EHR has the ability to transfer data to other EHRs, hospitals, labs. It is about the PATIENT receiving the best care and is not dependent on the physical location of the patient.

Others define EHR as a longitudinal electronic record of patient health information generated by one or more encounters in any care delivery setting and includes a variety of patient information such as demographics, medications, past medical history etc.

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What Does It Mean To Be Patient Centric?

Almost every Pharma company today calls itself “patient centric”.  But how many truly put their patients first or have patients at the heart of their business model?

Here are 24 things Pharma-or any company for that matter-can do to get closer to being patient centric:

  1. Listen to your patients/customers. They often know what’s important. Social Media has made this much easier to do.
  2. Converse with patients…on-going if possible. Dialog is more than pushing out one-way messages…
  3. View the world through their eyes–as they see it-not as you want it to be. Try living in their shoes…
  4. Provide impeccable customer service 24/7–answer the phones, consider live web customer service. ‘The customer is always right.’
  5. Provide real- time product updates  as new information becomes available; the good, the bad and the ugly (efficacy and safety).
  6. Provide easy to understand information about your products’ benefits and risks. Might you explore use of the drug facts box? (Patient Risk Communication FDA Advisory MeetingContinue reading